Pooja Krishna, II Year B. A. English

The world, according to me, is divided into three kinds of people. Those who, upon seeing an injured puppy on the road, would kick it, rejoicing in its pain; those who would feel compassion for the animal and immediately rush it to a place where help would be provided, and the third and worst kind: those who show inaction in the times when action is required; those who wouldn’t spare the poor thing a second glance. Those are the kind of people for whom the last circle of hell is reserved for, or so Dante Alighieri says. But let’s put that thought aside for a moment.

Now, for the second category of people, who would immediately help the animal. Not all of us who fall into the second category are veterinarians. So what do we do? We take the animal to the ‘experts’. Those who are trained to help in those kinds of situations. The Blue Cross Of India, a.k.a. the place where free aid is provided for animals, because let’s face it, not all of us who fall into the category are millionaires, and we can’t afford to spend hard-earned money on an injured mutt, no matter how big our hearts are.

Little do we know that nothing in the world is free.

Do we wonder what happens to the animal we rescued after we leave it at the Blue Cross? We automatically assume that it would get its happily ever after, as we go on with our busy lives. We couldn’t be more wrong. The sad truth is that there is a good chance that we have left the animal in a state more perilous than the one we found it in.

When we think of the Blue Cross, we immediately wonder how kind and unselfish they are to dedicate their lives to help the voiceless. Little do we realize that they do more harm to the animals in their care.

According to popular reviews and statistics, any animal left in the care of the Blue Cross survives for less than 20 days, no matter how healthy it was when it was admitted there. A lot of people who have adopted animals from the Blue Cross have left negative reviews, sharing their experiences, as many of them saw their beloved pets die before their very eyes.

‘Dirty’ is the word that immediately came to mind the first time I visited the Blue Cross. Dirty and unhygienic. I had to control my tears as I looked at the poor souls who peered at me from behind bars (both literally and metaphorically). Very few animals were allowed to roam around outside independently, and the young ones were shut up in huge, dirty cages (that were probably cleaned once a month or something).Proper vaccinations were not given to all animals, and serious diseases were overlooked, according to some reviews.

Of course, the Blue Cross cannot take the entire blame for its treatment of animals. Lack of funds is becoming a serious issue, which automatically leads to insufficient medical and other kinds of help needed.

‘If this was an organization serving humans, would they be this casual?’ asks Sudha, a person who has witnessed, firsthand, the cruelty that animals go through at the organization.

That is the problem here. Here is where the third and last category of people come in. The world is filled with the kind of people who are too busy running along with their lives to spare even an iota of concern, let alone money, to those they consider lesser than them, and unfortunately, the Blue Cross has some of those kinds of people, too. Some people join the Blue Cross just to earn a good name and not out of genuine care for animals.

The motto of the Blue Cross is, ‘Animals – It’s their world, too.’ I think the real problem lies in us assuming that the world is ours, to begin with.

[Photograph Source: YouTube]

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